Issue 59 Improving access to water supply and sanitation services for the poor
CONTENTS
+ WSP News
bulletAfrica
bulletEast Asia and the Pacific
bulletGlobal
bulletLatin America and the
Caribbean
bulletSouth Asia
+ Publications & Learning Resources
+ Events Calendar
+ In Other News

“...fragile states do not need sympathy, but pulling together with their partners to re-establish sound policy platforms that will enable them to swiftly utilize opportunities that are at their disposal in order to demonstrate early gains and secure support from users and citizens. This is not easy but it presents about the only formidable strategy for recovery and sustainable sector development.”

- Kenyan Ministry of Water Permanent Secretary David Stower’s remarks during a workshop on delivering water supply and sanitation in fragile states

 
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+ WSP NEWS
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AFRICA
Mobile Phones Transform Rural Water Supply for 556,000 in Mali
Zimbabwe’s Water and Sanitation Sector Gets Capacity Boost from Ghana, Kenya
New Mobile Phone-based Technology Helps Liberia Map Rural Water Points, Informs Poverty Reduction Strategy
Malawi Learns from Demand-led Sanitation Approaches in Burkina Faso
EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
Media Push Opens Indonesian Bank Doors to Community Water Organizations for First Time
Lao PDR Gets Knowledge Boost on Sanitation Marketing from Indonesia
“Easy Latrine” Helps Improve Lives of 60,000 People in Cambodia
GLOBAL
60 Experts in 60 Minutes Share Solutions to Water and Sanitation Crisis
New Survey: Water Tariffs Driven Higher by Electricity Prices
Transformational Infrastructure: New World Bank Group Strategy Looks Across Sectors
LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
Peru Factors Disaster Risk to Urban Water and Sanitation
A New Soap Superhero Goes Global: Handwashing Social Campaign Wins International Publicity Award
SOUTH ASIA
Access to Sanitation Private Sector Providers Helps Enable Sustained Latrine Use at Scale
Lessons from India: Going Beyond Traditional Ways of Doing Business in Rural Water Supply and Sanitation
Tackling the Growing Menace of Solid and Liquid Waste
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+ PUBLICATIONS & LEARNING RESOURCES
VIDEOS
 
 
Water Point Mapping in Liberia
Liberia can now consolidate and expand interventions in the rural water sector thanks to a detailed digital map and inventory that uses GPS to locate the existing safe water points, their functionality, type, construction date, water quality, and other data. The digital map was developed with support from WSP using an innovative open-source software called FLOW, or Field-Level Operations Watch.
Indonesia Community-based Water Organizations
Community-based water organizations manage to provide piped water to 3 to 5 times more households than the local water utility in some parts of Indonesia. Their service has always been in high demand, but they cannot expand their service and coverage due to the lack of financing facility. This short video features the main issues and challenges facing the water providers and the crux of WSP’s Second Generation Project.
 
PUBLICATIONS
Lessons in Urban Sanitation Development - Indonesia Sanitation Sector Development Program 2006 - 2010
  In just four years, the Indonesia Sanitation Sector Development Program (ISSDP) has been instrumental in opening a Government-owned pathway to address complex urban sanitation challenges, according to this new WSP field note. It explores key design and implementation lessons from the ISSDP, which operated from 2006 to 2010. By the time the program ended, the Government’s commitment to urban sanitation had grown remarkably: 12 cities had developed city sanitation strategies and started to implement them, government budgets for sanitation had increased by 300 percent, and a national roadmap containing commitments to scale up the ISSDP approach in over 300 cities had been formally adopted by the Government and launched by the Vice President.
Download here
   
Handwashing with Soap – Two Paths to National Scale Programs – Lessons from the Field: Indonesia and Vietnam
  There are now at least two proven paths a country can take to successfully ensure their people wash hands with soap, according to this new WSP Field Note. It describes two Southeast Asian programs that are making handwashing with soap a feature of everyday lives on a national scale: the Handwashing Initiative in Vietnam, which has reached nearly two million caretakers of young children and 80,000 students; and the Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing with Soap in Indonesia, which has contributed to reaching millions of students, mothers, workers, and travelers.
Download here
   
Economic Impact from the 2007 Earthquake on the Water and Sanitation Sector in 4 Provinces in Peru (Spanish)
  No risk management means significant costs in the water and sanitation sector, according to this new WSP technical paper. If water utilities in Peru had applied Disaster Risk Management (DRM), such as well maintained and seismic-proof built systems, they would have saved up to 27 times the cost of infrastructure rehabilitation following the 2007 earthquake. This paper aims to raise awareness of the importance of including DRM in the sector, share findings of the study, give technical tools to specialists, and promote further, similar studies.
Download here
   

A Long Term Sustainability of Improved Sanitation in Rural Bangladesh

In this new research brief analysis of 53 Union Parishads that were declared 100 percent sanitized/Open Defecation Free almost five years ago, shows that 90 percent of households have sustained use of a latrine that adequately confines feces.

 
Download here
   

Additional Publications from South Asia

  • Improving Water and Sanitation Service Delivery in India: Lessons from a Workshop on Service Line Benchmarking
    Download here

  • Laying the Blueprint for a Model Water Utility
    Download here


  • A Decade of the Total Sanitation Campaign: Rapid Assessment of Processes and Outcomes Volume 1 and Volume 2
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+ EVENTS CALENDAR
American Water Works Association Annual Conference
Washington, DC, June 12-16, 2011
http://www.awwa.org/ACE11
Singapore International Water Week
July 4-8, 2011
http://www.siww.com.sg
ADB Water Event: Water Crisis and choices
July 11-14, 2010
AfricaSan 3 on Sanitation and Hygiene
Kigali, Rwanda - July 19-21, 2011
Contact: Yolande Coombes, ycoombes@worldbank.org
World Water Week 2011
Stockholm, Sweden. August 21-27, 2011
http://www.worldwaterweek.org
Global PURE Water Expo
Las Vegas, US. September 22-24 2011
http://www.purewaterexpo.com
Water and Health Conference: Where Science Meets Policy
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA. October 3-7, 2011
http://whconference.unc.edu
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+ IN OTHER NEWS
News from our partners

Charity: water Gives Video Perspective on Water
Unsafe water and lack of basic sanitation cause 80 percent of diseases and kill more people every year than all forms of violence, even war. charity: water’s creative team teamed up with Google to produce a 3-minute animated short that explains the water crisis and how it can be solved. Friend and supporter Kristen Bell (actress from Forgetting Sarah Marshall and voice of Gossip Girl) joined charity: water as a guest narrator. Watch Here

   

USAID Partnership with Indonesia Will Improve Urban Water and Sanitation
USAID announced a new activity in March called the USAID Indonesia Urban Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (USAID IUWASH) Project. The project builds on over 10 years of collaborative assistance with the Government of Indonesia in safe water and sanitation. IUWASH is a five-year, US$33.7 million effort that will expand access to water and sanitation services to Indonesia’s urban poor, currently those people with the most limited access to these services.

“The IUWASH project will provide an additional 2 million Indonesians with access to improved water supplies and decrease per unit costs paid by the poor by 20 percent,” explained USAID Mission Director Walter North.

Safe Water for Africa Partnership to Bring Water to 2 Million Africans by 2012 
At the World Economic Forum on Africa, Global Water Challenge (GWC) member Coca-Cola, Diageo plc, the International Finance Corporation (IFC) and WaterHealth International (WHI) announced Safe Water for Africa, a strategic partnership to work with communities to drive the expansion of WHI’s innovative water service delivery model across the continent. The partnership will focus initially on West Africa, in support of a region with tremendous promise, yet one that continues to face significant water challenges. To meet the great need in the region, WHI will work with communities to build WaterHealth Centres (WHCs) throughout the region. To learn more, click here.

   

Four Million Rural Kenyans To Get Safe Drinking Water Thanks To New Lifestraw® “Carbon For Water™” Program Financed With Carbon Credits
Close to one million LifeStraw® Family water filters have been installed in households in the Western Province of Kenya from April 26 through May 2011. The province-wide, door-to-door, free distribution program reached about 90 percent of all homes without access to safe municipal water sources. It will provide at least ten years worth of safe drinking water for Kenyan residents and do so without any cost to local residents, governmental agencies, or donor groups.

Vestergaard Frandsen, a European company specializing in disease control products, provided US$25 million to launch the “Carbon For Water™” program (see www.carbonforwater.com), and will be reimbursed with carbon financing. The unique funding model gives companies in developed countries potential revenue, in the form of carbon credits, for sponsoring programs that reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developing countries. Carbon credits can then be sold to carbon credit buyers that want to reduce their carbon footprint or improve their environmental stewardship. The revenue generated will largely be reinvested into the project to make it sustainable for at least ten years.

   
PATH Launches Household Water Treatment and Storage (HWTS) Guidelines
PATH Safe Water Project recently launched the Household Water Treatment and Storage (HWTS) design guidelines, a compilation of guidelines generated from three years of research and development on HWTS devices in developing-world settings. These guidelines describe PATH’s recommendations for designing and developing durable water filters for low-income users.
   
Proof Point by Water For People
In April, Water For People introduced Proof Point, a new one-page publication series designed to share innovation, highlight learning, and enlist discussion around improving and expanding the possibilities for sustainably providing water and sanitation services for everyone. It will be based on field work, reports, monitoring and evaluation, and research. Proof Point will be a place to swiftly communicate ideas and learning and will become a source of evidence of opportunities as well as what’s working. Proof Point will be published in English, Spanish and French and will be available as a PDF and online.
     

New videos on sanitation and hygiene in South Asia, Global Sanitation Fund
Four short videos were produced recently by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC):

  • South Asia: Equity and Inclusion in Sanitation and Hygiene
  • South Asia: The Heart of the Matter -- Peoples' Voices on Sanitation and Hygiene
  • GSF Partners Talk About the Global Sanitation Fund
  • The Global Sanitation Fund: How it Works
To view the videos, visit WSSCC website.
   

2011 World Water Week in Stockholm, Registration Now Open
Responding to global changes: Water in an urbanising world
Registration is now open for the 2011 World Water Week in Stockholm, August 21-27. This year, the conference will key in on the many dimensions of the urban water challenge in over 100 seminars, workshops and side events. Register today to join 2500 experts, practitioners, decision makers, and business innovators from around the globe to exchange ideas, foster new thinking and develop solutions. Explore the program at www.worldwaterweek.org. Early bird discount runs through June 30.

   
Securing a Healthier Future in a Changing World
The Global Health Council’s 38th Annual International Conference on Global Health, “Securing a Healthier Future in a Changing World,” covers all areas of global health - including water and sanitation – with a special focus this year on the challenges of, and innovative solutions to address the demographic changes that have shifted the global burden of disease - from acute to chronic diseases, from infectious to non-communicable diseases, like cancer, diabetes, heart disease and acute respiratory disease. The world’s largest global health conference not focused on a single disease or health area, will be held June 13-17 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C.
   
Keynotes and Workshops for 2011 Water and Health Conference, October 3-7, 2011, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
Attendees of this year’s conference have the opportunity to hear four keynote presentations from renowned experts spanning human rights, water resources, policy, practice, and financing. Keynote Presenters are Catarina de Albuquerque, Charles J. Vörösmarty, Jaehyang So, and Frank Rijsberman. Complete bios: http://whconference.unc.edu/keynotes.cfm. Registration is now open; early bird rate ends 31 July 2011. http://whconference.unc.edu/register.cfm.
   

H2O for Life’s Walk for Water
H2O for Life sponsored a Walk for Water at Target Field in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the home of the Minnesota Twins on April 16th in collaboration with Global Youth Service Day. Over 900 participants walked a 5k course to raise awareness and funds for water. Around the country, other H2O for Life schools planned walks on the same day.

Over 200 schools are currently raising funds for partner schools around the world that are desperately in need of water, sanitation and hygiene education. For further information on how you can help, visit: www.h2oforlifeschools.org

   
Global Health Council’s 2011 Annual International Conference on Global Health
The Global Health Council’s 2011 Annual International Conference on Global Health, “Securing a Healthier Future in a Changing World,” will focus on the challenges of and innovative solutions to address the demographic changes that have shifted the global burden of disease — from acute to chronic diseases, from infectious to non-communicable diseases, like cancer, diabetes, heart disease and acute respiratory disease. The conference, the world’s largest global health conference not focused on a single disease or health area, will be held June 13-17 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C.: http://www.globalhealth.org/conference_2011/
   
Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) response to South Asian Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN)
FANSA, WaterAid and WSSCC welcome The Colombo Declaration, which outlines ministerial commitments made in the SACOSAN-IV, and are pleased to see that it reflects much of the declaration of the Pre-SACOSAN-IV Consultation Meeting of CSOs. This demonstrates the value of our intensive work up to and during SACOSAN-IV. We hope that the commitments of our Governments in South Asia will generate the required momentum for accelerated progress on sanitation and hygiene. Continue reading here.
   
Water Missions International launches new initiative to Alleviate the Global Water Crisis
Water Missions International, an engineering relief and development Christian nonprofit has launched a new initiative that is taking steps to end the global water crisis. The initiative, Walk in a Bucket, provides people around the country an opportunity to engage their local community in making an impact around the world by hosting their very own Walk for Water event. For more information, visit http://www.watermissions.org/have-your-own-walk. For more information regarding Water Mission Internation, please visit www.watermissions.org.
   

Water For People: EVERYONE Means Exactly – Everyone
Water For People’s mission, like many in the water and sanitation space, says we are working towards a world where everyone has access to improved supplies of water and hygienic sanitation services sustainably. This means that water flows forever and pathogen-rich fecal matter never again threatens human health. Success will create the foundations for countries to develop, communities to thrive, girls and boys to attend school and water- and sanitation-related diseases to be so dramatically reduced that they no longer are a threat.

A big ambition! But how do we achieve this grand goal? How does Water For People actually program and operate to give real meaning to this ambition, so that the mission may become achievable, not simply aspirational? Water For People is trying to model a strategic set of interventions in the countries where they operate. Read about them here.

   

UN Water
Click here for UN Water’s latest newsletter.

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+ WSP NEWS - CONTINUED
AFRICA
Mobile Phones Transform Rural Water Supply for 556,000 in Mali

The innovative use of mobile telephones to support billing services, record keeping, and equipment operation is transforming the management of rural and small town water systems in Mali. A total of 55 small water providers, with access to 556,000 consumers across rural Mali, have signed up to an initiative in which mobile phones are used to improve their operational efficiencies. Water bills are now sent to customers through their mobile phones, and water system supervisors can monitor expenses and cash flows through phone-to-web interfaces. Water equipment is also monitored remotely, for example, technicians receive a message alert on their phones when machinery needs to be serviced or repaired.

The mobile phone application providing the interface for this technology – known as mWater – is the result of a public-private partnership between the National Water Department of Mali and Manobi, a Senegalese phone-to-web service provider, with experience in developing user-paid mobile telephony solutions for the water sector in West Africa. The aim is to strengthen the capacity of rural and small water operators in rural Mali to provide efficient and quality services on a cost-recovery basis.

The initiative is receiving financial and technical support from WSP, the French Development Agency (AFD), and UNICEF. The advent of mobile phone-based services in the rural water sector is in response to increases in mobile phone coverage and adoption in Africa. Development projects linked to mobile telephony have proliferated in a variety of sectors, including agriculture, health, education, emergency response, and governance.

Contact: Dominick de Waal at wspaf@worldbank.org

Zimbabwe’s Water and Sanitation Sector Gets Capacity Boost from Ghana, Kenya

Greater consensus on the overall direction of Zimbabwe’s revised water and sanitation sector policy is just one of the results from a learning visit by two Zimbabwean ministers and nine senior officials in March to learn from experiences in Kenya and Ghana.

Further, Zimbabwe’s ministries of water and local government are now champions for ring-fencing of water accounts by utilities and realize the need to reassess water tariffs. There is also renewed interest in community-based approaches to water supply maintenance, and the need to focus on scalable sanitation and hygiene solutions to benefit the rural poor, who lack access to improved sanitary facilities.

For almost a decade, the water and sanitation sector in Zimbabwe has been in decline, marked by isolation from international experience and severe loss of experienced staff. A key element in the recovery process is the revision of the water and sanitation sector policy to reflect the changing operating environment, especially regarding land tenure, fiscal space, and settlement patterns.

In Kenya, the delegation exchanged lessons with Kenya’s Ministry of Water and Irrigation management team. In Ghana, the learning exchange involved the Minister for Water, the Department of Water Resources, the Ghana Water Company, the Community Water and Sanitation Agency, UNICEF, and the Public Utility Regulatory Commission.

The key lessons for Zimbabwe included:

  • a rationale for separating the functions of water resources management, utilization, and regulation
  • insight into the potential of public-private partnerships in the management of water services
  • the need to establish an independent public utility regulator
  • the importance of broad-based public consultations in policy formulation
  • the importance of community involvement in managing water supply and sanitation services.

Contact: Thomas Fugelsnes at wspaf@worldbank.org

New Mobile Phone-based Technology Helps Liberia Map Rural Water Points, Informs Poverty Reduction Strategy

Liberia can now consolidate and expand interventions in the rural water sector thanks to a detailed digital map and inventory that locates the existing safe water points, their functionality, type, construction date, water quality and other data. The digital map was developed with support from WSP using an innovative open-source software called FLOW, or Field-Level Operations Watch. Click here for a related video.

With WSP support, the Ministry of Public Works deployed 150 data collectors on motorcycles and equipped with phones using the FLOW software to map the rural water points. The month-long exercise – through extremely challenging environments – succeeded in mapping 7,500 safe water points. This data will enable detailed costing and needs assessments, which will feed into Liberia’s poverty reduction strategy and other planning and implementation instruments.

Liberia emerged from a 14-year civil war in 2003, and the country’s infrastructure is still severely impaired and recovering slowly. In the rural water-sector, the initial post-conflict response involved numerous NGOs in providing critically needed emergency water supplies by sinking boreholes and installing pumps. However, these efforts were not coordinated. Some areas of the country were neglected, and even where water points were built, many are already not functioning. Moreover, the country lacks a nationally coordinated, comprehensive and well-targeted investment program. Household surveys indicate that rural access to safe water is at 50 percent.

Beyond development of the digital water point maps, the initiative demonstrated the potential value of FLOW – a new survey and mapping tool that could simplify similar work across a wide variety of sectors. The FLOW software can be loaded onto any Android smartphone with a GPS chip and camera, transforming it into an integrated mapping device connected to a central database. The FLOW-enabled phones were used to take pictures of the water points, record the GPS location, and transmit the data to central servers.
Contact: Maximilian Hirn at wspaf@worldbank.org

Malawi Learns from Demand-led Sanitation Approaches in Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso's success in increasing demand for improved sanitation among the urban poor in 2010 is now spreading to the cities of Lilongwe and Blantyre, respectively Malawi’s capital and commercial cities, which have been grappling with the challenge of improving access to sanitation in fast-expanding low income areas.

Following a WSP-facilitated learning exchange to Burkina Faso in 2010, 1680 households in Blantyre constructed by March 2011 improved toilets using masons trained under the project. At least 8 entrepreneurs were newly working as pit emptiers and had provided the service to at least 283 households. In Lilongwe at least 2,407 households had improved from a traditional pit to an improved pit with a concrete slab.

Under the second phase of the National Water Development Programme (NWDP II), Malawi's Ministry of Irrigation and Water Development is implementing an Urban Water Supply and Sanitation (UWSS) component with funding from the World Bank. UWSS is being implemented by the Lilongwe and Blantyre Water Boards as key government agencies on the urban sanitation component. WSP is providing technical assistance to improve access to water and sanitation services in peri-urban areas of the two cities

In 2010, WSP facilitated a learning exchange to Burkina Faso for a delegation comprising staff from the Ministry of Irrigation and Water Development, the Blantyre and Lilongwe Water Boards, the Blantyre and Lilongwe City Assemblies, and two NGOs - Water Aid and Water for People. In Burkina Faso, the Malawi delegation were exposed to sanitation marketing for improved pit latrines, with a focus on the role of the private sector in delivering sanitation services and financing mechanisms for sanitation improvements.

Following this visit, the Blantyre and Lilongwe Water Boards developed and are implementing a sanitation marketing strategy officially launched in March 2011, focusing on getting households to improve their pit latrines and hand washing behaviors. Implementation of the marketing program is financed by the World Bank’s fund for the poorest (IDA), the European Investment Bank, European Union, Water Aid, Water for People, while WSP continues to provide technical support to the process.

A key feature of the Malawi program is the harmonization of the sanitation marketing activities through development and use of agreed and common approaches, tools, and materials by all implementing partners.
Contact: Barbara Kazimbaya-Senkwe at wspaf@worldbank.org

EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC

Media Push Opens Indonesian Bank Doors to Community Water Organizations for First Time

Bank Jabar Banten and Bank PD-BPR in Indonesia responded immediately to a media push aimed at fostering banking support for water providers by immediately appraising proposals from two community-based water organizations (CBOs). In less than a week, both banks completed field visits and appraisals of the four best performing CBOs and by the end of May, for the first time two CBOs became bankable and obtained bank credit.

WSP teamed up with the national news media on March 22 - World Water Day to build banking support for water providers by promoting water champions from both community-based water organizations (CBOs) and local governments. The project had found difficulties engaging banks for various reasons, including uncertainties surrounding the legal status of the CBOs or the lack of collateral. The event convened stakeholders of WSP’s Second Generation Project in a bid to facilitate collaboration to speed up efforts to meet project objectives of helping obtain stakeholder commitment and building government support for professionalizing community water providers.

"We all know that CBOs have been filling the gaps [in water provision],” said Bandung District Head Dadang Nasir to the gathering with bankers, members of the AusAID-supported Indonesia Infrastructure Initiative, and WSP. “We cannot turn a blind eye to their role, and all of us - government, mass media, WSP, and the banking sector - have to help them expand their services. Therefore, I am urging the banks who are here today to please carry out your appraisals of the CBOs as soon as possible because [project] time is running out."

Involving national and regional media agencies, the World Water Day event aimed to draw attention to project results and success stories, and resulted in wide media coverage including in Indonesia’s top rated TV news program. The district head urged banks to open their doors to CBOs looking for financial access. The two banks responded quickly following the airing.
Contact: Yosa Yuliarsa or Deviariandy Setiawan at wspeap@worldbank.org

Lao PDR Gets Knowledge Boost on Sanitation Marketing from Indonesia

The Lao People’s Democratic Republic is adopting a sanitation marketing approach to delivery of sanitation services following an exposure visit of a delegation from Lao PDR to Total Sanitation and Sanitation Marketing (TSSM) sites in East Java, Indonesia in late March.

“Adapting this approach to the Lao context would help make sanitation more accessible and sustainable in rural areas,” said Dr. Vath Kongkeo, Deputy Director of Public Health Department, Champasak Province, one of the two provinces that have declared some villages open-defecation free in Lao PDR.

The visit provided an opportunity for the Lao government’s technical staff to gain broader knowledge on how Indonesia tackles rural sanitation issues through a non-subsidy approach. In spite of differences in the two countries’ conditions, key principles of sanitation marketing remain relevant and could be adapted to fit the Lao context.

“The National Centre for Environmental Health and Water Supply will take the lead in implementing this approach, starting with the existing pilot sites in Champasak and Sekong Provinces,” he said, adding that the government will soon carry out sanitation market assessments to gain insights on consumer demand and supply potential in the provinces.

The visit focused on monitoring, total sanitation promotion and implementation, and private sector response to increasing demand for sanitation products and services.
Contact: Viengsamay Vongkhamsao at wspeap@worldbank.org

“Easy Latrine” Helps Improve Lives of 60,000 People in Cambodia

About 12,000 rural households have gained access to hygienic latrines supplied by local producers under a sanitation marketing program in Cambodia. WSP, along with financial support from USAID, has been supporting the program in Svay Rieng and Kandal to enable rural households to install “Easy Latrines” through local producers. The “Easy Latrine” earns its name twice: for producers it is easy to make, market, and transport; for users it is easy to buy, build, use, and maintain.

After 16 months of implementation by International Development Enterprises (IDE) with support from WSP and USAID, the program has surpassed its initial goal of selling 10,000 latrines. Households in rural areas can now have a ready-to-build toilet delivered within a day to their door. This benefit has gone beyond the people living in the two pilot provinces to seven other provinces.

WSP is in the process of distilling key lessons from this pilot, which will inform design features of a follow-on program that will support the Government of Cambodia in scaling up the campaign to other areas, as well as in deepening the outreach in the initial pilot districts.
Contact: Phyrum Kov at wspeap@worldbank.org

GLOBAL

60 Experts in 60 Minutes Share Solutions to Water and Sanitation Crisis

“While there are alternatives to fossil fuels, there are no alternatives for water.”
“We can’t think of people as beneficiaries but as customers who demand access to safe water and sanitation.”
“Water is a global issue, but the truth is in the details, needs are local.”
“We have to create a norm of behavior that water is now more precious than oil.”

These are some of the nuances shared by leading experts in the field of water and sanitation this month during a virtual conference, Future of Water, produced by the Dow Chemical Company-hosted The Future We Create.

Experts from WSP, the World Bank, Harvard University, Coca-Cola, USAID, the Nature Conservancy, Proctor and Gamble, the Global Environment and Technololgy Fund/Global Water Challenge, WASH Advocacy Initiative/Water Advoacates, among others, each for one minute shared nuances and potential solutions of the ongoing water and sanitation crisis. Click here to view the video and to stay tuned as the online conference further develops.
Contact: Christopher Walsh at cwalsh@worldbank.org

New Survey: Water Tariffs Driven Higher by Electricity Prices

Since 2010, tariffs charged to households by water and sanitation utilities significantly increased in developing countries, in some cases by up to 50 percent. Although this points to an improvement in these utilities’ ability to cover operating costs, currency devaluations essentially canceled out the increase. This is according to WSP’s International Benchmarking Network for Water and Sanitation Utilities (IBNET) 2011 tariff survey (http://www.ib-net.org/en/tariffs_map.php), which allows a quick comparison of the price of water charged to households among more than 200 of the world's largest cities that regularly report their performance and tariffs.

Water tariffs were lowest in South and Southeast Asia, rarely higher than US$0.15 per cubic meter.

Also since 2010, tariffs significantly increased in most of Europe and the United States, reflecting the higher cost of electricity and increased attention to wastewater effluent quality. US currency devaluation contributed to the increase in Austria, France, and Switzerland, where tariffs were not changed into local currency during the last year. Tariffs in Italy remain the lowest among the G8 countries. Financed via property taxes or from the national budget, water continues to be free for all consumers in Iceland, Ireland, and Turkmenistan.

The tariff survey updates 2010 information and complements existing IBNET tools and reports. Tariffs are compared on the basis of water prices charged to domestic users per cubic meter for the first 15 cubic meters.
Contact: Alexander Danilenko at wsp@worldbank.org

Transformational Infrastructure: New World Bank Group Strategy Looks Across Sectors

Infrastructure is increasingly seen as a vehicle for transforming low-income and middle-income countries. The sector has emerged as an agent of change for countries facing rapid urbanization, catastrophic natural disasters, the threat of a changing climate, and environmental degradation.

World Bank experts say that today’s infrastructure problems are multi-sectoral, require a cross-cutting approach, and possibly integrated solutions. A new Bank Group Infrastructure Strategy update proposes to continue to support the core business of infrastructure to meet countries’ basic access needs, with an enhanced focus on ‘transformational infrastructure,’ mobilization of private capital and other sources of financing.

“By focusing on transformational infrastructure, the World Bank Group wants to view infrastructure beyond traditional physical output towards a component connected to other sectors,” said Nancy Vandycke, lead economist in the Transport, Water, and ICT Department, and coordinator for the Infrastructure Strategy. “That new focus presents new opportunities for transformational impact of our investments in client countries.” Click here for more.
Contact: Christopher Walsh at cwalsh@worldbank.org

LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

Peru Factors Disaster Risk to Urban Water and Sanitation

Disaster Risk Management tools and methodologies developed by WSP have caught the attention of National authorities in Peru. The Ministry of Housing, Construction, and Sanitation announced the incorporation of these tools in the update of the National Sanitation Plan, which will be finished by December 2011. The Ministry also indicated that the sector will use WSP’s methodology for updating Regional Water and Sanitation Plans. WSP’s technical guide to protect the water and sewerage systems from disasters will be included in National Building Codes. The Ministry will also make use of its capacity-building program to generate disaster risk management knowledge among the water utilities.

The set of WSP innovations in Disaster Risk Management was shared in the 1st National Seminar of Disaster Risk Management in Water and Sanitation among 40 Peruvian water companies, representing 80 percent of the total urban utilities in the country. Among the disaster risk management tools presented, the following stood out:

  • Tool-kit to protect the water infrastructure from disasters
  • Financial risk protection strategy
  • Low-cost methodology for risk assessment
WSP also invited experts from other countries of the region to the event, including Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Ecuador, to share how they apply Disaster Risk Management in their water and sanitation sectors. At the closing ceremony, the Ministry reaffirmed its interest in including guidelines and methodologies to mainstream disaster risk management in the water and sanitation sector.
Contact: Gustavo Perochena at wsplac@worldbank.org
A New Soap Superhero Goes Global: Handwashing Social Campaign Wins International Publicity Award

The 5th edition of the International Publicity Contest, Publifestival, held in Barcelona, Spain awarded the WSP and VenVa Communications with the first prize in the category “Best International Social Project in Health” for its communications campaign to promote handwashing with soap to avoid illnesses.

The Super Jaboncin campaign was carried on through 2009 and 2010 in 20 regions of Peru in the framework of the Handwashing Initiative promoted by WSP. So far, although the project’s impact evaluation end line assessment is still in progress, government authorities found evidence demonstrating a drop in infant diarrhea in some of the regions targeted by the intervention. For example, in Piura the regional government found a 25 percent drop in diarrheal incidents in Huarmaca; and the regional health sector found a 74 percent decrease in Tumbes and a 57 percent drop in Arequipa.

The communication strategy revolved around the adventures of Super Jaboncin (or “Super Little Soap”), a hero that has special lenses that allows him to see the germs nobody else sees and to fight them with the power of water and soap. Super Jaboncin protects children by sharing “the super power of soap” – to face Listeria, the invisible bacteria; Protzo (protozoan) and the Fong (fungus) Family. Clear messages and a rap melody were aired through local radio chains, and used to animate promotional events in main plazas and school yards. Games and contests engaged children and their families in lively events. 300,000 women and children participated in the Super Jaboncin events.
Contact: Rocio Florez at wsplac@worldbank.org

SOUTH ASIA
Access to Sanitation Private Sector Providers Helps Enable Sustained Latrine Use at Scale

In the new research brief, Long Term Sustainability of Improved Sanitation in Rural Bangladesh, analysis of 53 Union Parishads that were declared 100 percent sanitized/Open Defecation Free almost five years ago, shows that 90 percent of households have sustained use of a latrine that adequately confines feces.

Factors associated with this outcome include:

  • a shift in social norms away from open defecation to using a latrine
  • on-going sanitation programming that reinforces latrine use; and
  • easy access to private sector sanitation providers.
In addition, a comparative analysis of four programmatic approaches used to reach 100 percent sanitation coverage and cessation of open defecation revealed little variation in sustained outcomes in these 53 Union Parishads. This research brief summarizes findings from a Technical Report.

Contact: Craig Kullman at wsp@worldbank.org
Lessons from India: Going Beyond Traditional Ways of Doing Business in Rural Water Supply and Sanitation

As part of its knowledge-sharing and capacity-building agenda, the Department of Drinking Water and Sanitation in India’s Ministry of Rural Development and WSP released two documents that compile best practices in achieving total sanitation and drinking water security from across India. From Dreams to Reality and Towards Drinking Water Security in India were prepared with the support of WSP and the World Bank.

The case studies illustrate achievements made by rural communities and local governments to accelerate sanitation coverage, ensure sustainable aquifers, address water quality issues and provide equitable, reliable, and affordable water services to rural people in India. These compendia distill learning from the numerous documented case studies as a means to achieve an open-defecation free India and ensure long term drinking water security.

Contact: C. Ajith Kumar at wspsa@worldbank.org
Tackling the Growing Menace of Solid and Liquid Waste

In rural areas of India, solid and liquid waste remains largely untreated and dumped in the open, posing a severe threat to public health and the environment. It is estimated that nearly 18 billion liters of liquid waste and 400,000 metric tons of solid waste is generated each day in rural areas of India. Adopting effective systems at scale is the only reliable way to dispose of this waste safely and sustainably. Different working models of waste management in rural parts of the country have been successfully implemented not only at the household, but also at the institutional and community level.

Two films recently produced by WSP in partnership with Department of Drinking Water and Sanitation, Government of India, demonstrate these models, selected technology options and how they work. To order copies of the videos Nirmal Bharat: A Journey through Clean India or Technology Options for Waste Management in Rural India

Contact: Vandana Mehra at wspsa@worldbank.org
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