August 2009 Improving access to water supply and sanitation services for the poor
CONTENTS
+ WSP News
bulletAfrica
bulletEast Asia and Pacific
bulletLatin America and the
Caribbean
bulletGlobal
bulletSouth Asia
+ Publications & Learning Resources
+ Events Calendar
+ In Other News
Progress lies in move towards healthy society
“Let me remind you that we cannot afford to be complacent. We should not be lulled into gauging progress through latrine coverage alone. Progress lies in the confidence of a family that their child will live beyond the age of five. Progress lies in a household budget which is not so consumed by expenditures on health-care, so that a family cannot pull themselves out of poverty. Progress lies in a school where enrollment rates do not diminish because children are perpetually ill; where girl children in particular can attend because they can be assured of the security and privacy of sanitary facilities.”

- Mr. Hameedullah Jan Afridi, Federal Minister for Environment, Government of Pakistan, during his opening remarks at the Conference on Sanitation May 28 -29, 2009, in Islamabad.

Contact: Irfan Saeed Alrai at wspsa@worldbank.org
 
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+ WSP NEWS
AFRICA
Mali Water Sector Embraces Public-Private Partnerships
African Countries Share Information for More Efficient Management
Advocating for Water and Sanitation Services in DRC
Volunteers Monitor Water Service Providers in Kenya
EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
First Draft of Water Law is Refined in Lao PDR
Handwashing Public Service Announcement Plays in Indonesian Banks, Factories
Mobilizing Domestic Private Sector Partnership in Three Countries
Strategic Plans Developed to Improve Service for 800,000 in Indonesia
Inter-local Government Initiatives
GLOBAL
New Report Identifies Barriers, Offers Solutions to Water and Sanitation Service Delivery to Urban Poor
LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
From LAC to the World: Lessons from Improved Hygiene Practices and Behavior Change Program in Peru
Using Improved Hygiene to Prevent Influenza A- H1N1
SOUTH ASIA
Pakistan Adopts Road Map to Achieve Sanitation Targets
Pakistan's Internally Displaced Get Clean Toilets
Half a Million People in Bangladesh Access Water Safe from Arsenic
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+ PUBLICATIONS & LEARNING RESOURCES
AFRICA
Are your hands clean enough? Study findings on handwashing with soap behavior in Kenya.
Findings of a baseline survey on handwashing-with-soap behavior in Kenya. Only available in print. Contact wspaf@worldbank.org to obtain a copy.
WSP-Africa Flier with Highlights and Achievement FY 09
Study for Financial and Economic Analysis of Ecological Sanitation in Sub-Saharan Africa
EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
WSP-EAP Flier with Highlights and Achievement FY 09
WSP-EAP Looking Ahead FY10 Flier
GLOBAL
Development Marketplace Grantee Toolkit – Project Design, Monitoring and Evaluation for Small Innovative Projects
WSP Global Brochure
"Water is Medicine: Why Water and Sanitation Matter to Global Public Health" - Interview with WSP Manager Jae So.
Guidance Notes on Services to the Urban Poor
Accompanying Volume: Global Experience on Expanding Water and Sanitation Services to the Urban Poor
LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
Sanitation, a perfect deal!
Water for Local Development
Creando Mercados de Saneamiento
WSP-LAC Flier with Highlights and Achievement FY 09
SOUTH ASIA
Report on National Dissemination for Horizontal Learning in Bangladesh
WSP-SA Flier with Highlights and Achievement FY 09
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+ EVENTS CALENDAR
Water Utilities and Law
September 3-4, 2009 Dundee, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
1st IWA Development Conference
September 29 - October 2, 2009, Lusaka, Republic of Zambia
1st IWA Development Conference
November 15-19, 2009, Mexico City, Mexico
For details on these and other upcoming events, please see our events calendar.
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+ IN OTHER NEWS
New Publications in the Water and Sanitation Sector
A new workbook from the World Health Organization describes how to develop and implement water safety plans in clear and practical terms. Advice is provided through 11 learning modules, each representing a key step in the water safety plan development and implementation.

Another new toolkit, RULE: reforming water governance, published by The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) introduces readers to the central role played by policy, law, and institutions in designing and implementing good governance for water resources. It will guide users through approaches to reforming water governance, including useful mechanisms for incorporating environmental considerations into water laws and policies.

A publication from the UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Climate Change Adaptation in the Water Sector, aims to provide a compendium of specific adaptation strategies for the water sector.  It will familiarize practitioners on how to use climate data, and on where and what kind of data is available.

The Water Integrity Network has released case information sheets to support local action and disseminate information on the creative and effective ways developed by many individuals, organizations, and initiatives worldwide to enhance water integrity on a global level.

The Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex, UK, has released Going to scale with community-led total sanitation. The paper reviews experiences with Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) and explores options for further development. The paper reviews developments in six of the countries where CLTS has spread: Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, Ethiopia and Kenya.

The World Water Assessment Programme published Investing in information, knowledge and monitoring, a paper arguing that not enough information about the water sector is produced. Information aids decision-making, it reduces ignorance and uncertainty, which often lead market failures, according to the paper. Information allows a better choice of infrastructure to be made.

A recent article in the Economist article notes the way that water shortages are having political impact in various countries, and that two global trends have added to accelerating pressure on the world’s water resources: demography and the shift from vegetarian diets to meaty ones.

Four cartoon booklets were recently produced by the Gender and Water Alliance, specifically targeted at school children and illiterate people. The booklets show self-explanatory pictures with brief additional texts.

In May WaterAid released a report called Fatal Neglect highlighting how the second biggest killer of under-fives, diarrhea, is being ignored by the public health and global development community.

In May PATH released a report called Diarrheal Disease: Solutions to Defeat a Global Killer. The report gives a history of diarrheal disease and discusses how something as preventable and treatable as diarrhea should not kill kids.

Water and Sanitation Online Resources Launched
WASHCost project, implemented by IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre with local partners in Burkina Faso, Ghana, India and Mozambique, launched a new website. The project (2008-2012) is researching the life-cycle costs of water, sanitation, and hygiene services in rural and peri-urban areas. Its rationale is that WASH governance will improve at all levels, as decision makers and stakeholders analyze the costs of sustainable, equitable and efficient services and put their knowledge to use.

With over 300,000 “followers” on Twitter, New York-based CharityWater reaches by far the largest audience in the water sector through the micro blogging site.

Meanwhile, the Centre for Science & Environment (CSE) in India has produced an interactive map depicting three stages in the history of the capital Delhi’s water supply: 1940-1970, 1970-2000, and 2000-now. The map depicts the locations of raw water intake works and water and wastewater treatment plants, together with their production capacities.

Separately, WaterAid has prepared water and sanitation technology pages on their website.  The pages allow individuals to see the various technology options and the advantages and disadvantages of each.
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+ WSP NEWS - CONTINUED
AFRICA
Mali Water Sector Embraces Public-Private Partnerships
To better manage the water sector, a number of rural and semi-urban Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) were developed in the water sector in Mali.  Currently 11 PPPs have signed contracts delegating to them from local governments the management of the water sector. Delegating management to PPPs was envisioned in both the Mali National Water Program and the Poverty Reduction Support Credit (PRSC), a World Bank financing mechanism.

To build on early encouraging results, the national water authority, Direction nationale de l'hydraulique (DNH) has, with the support of WSP, developed a coherent PPP action plan to be implemented over the next three years. The national action plan has been reviewed and agreed with a commission that includes the government authority, development partners, and donors.  Together with the French and German Development Agencies, AFD and GTZ, WSP has supported improving the quality of tendered documents, developing diagnostics to monitor the water sector, implementing business planning models, and organizing stakeholder workshops and learning trips. Several partners have agreed to finance the ongoing implementation of the action plan and provide technical assistance, including WSP, Public-Private Infrastructure Advisory Facility (PPIAF) and Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark (Danida).

Contact: Thomas Fugelsnes at wspaf@worldbank.org
African Countries Share Information for More Efficient Management
Water and sanitation experts from 10 African countries met recently in Dakar, Senegal and Nairobi, Kenya to launch an initiative to share information more efficiently across the water and sanitation sector. Information dissemination in the sector is key to improving governance, monitoring of water schemes and installations, and resource allocation.

At the heart of the initiative is the development of a regional online platform that will enable countries in Africa to develop and host their own water and sanitation internet portals. The portals will not only enable stakeholders to more easily share information within the sector, but they will also enable the sector to share information on access to water and sanitation at all levels of government and with citizens. The portals will be compatible with third party services in order to enhance collection of information in the sector and provide links to useful resources. The initiative is coordinated by WSP, which since 2006 has supported its clients in an effort to improve sector information and monitoring systems. Caritas and WaterAid, two international NGOs, shared their experiences at the meetings and confirmed their interest in pursuing the WatSan Platform in their monitoring programs.

Contact: Thomas Fugelsnes at wspaf@worldbank.org
Advocating for Water and Sanitation Services in DRC
Water and Sanitation ‘open days’ in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), attended by over 1,000 people, have led to increased public awareness about water and sanitation issues and is stimulating a push for increased allocation of public resources. These public events were organized with the support of the national water and sanitation committee (CNAEA), WSP, and other partners to raise the profile of water and sanitation on the national development agenda.

The initiative coincided with the signing of an agreement with the World Bank to invest US$190 million in improving urban water in the country’s three largest cities (Kinshasa, Lubunbashi, and Kisangani), and pledges by the African Development Bank and Belgian and German governments to improve water and sanitation services in rural and semi-urban areas. The ‘open days’ were held over three days in April and were attended by top-level government officials. Activities included exhibitions, a media campaign, round table discussions, and road shows.

Contact: Mbaye Seye at wspaf@worldbank.org

Volunteers Monitor Water Service Providers in Kenya
Kenya’s Water Service Regulatory Board (WASREB) has launched a program with the support of the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, the German Development Agency, and WSP to improve the collection, analysis, and use of consumer feedback in the country’s water and sanitation sector. In the pilot project, the regulator seeks to establish the best possible mechanism for efficient and effective consumer feedback in the sector and to evaluate how consumer feedback can be made most useful for service providers, Water Service Boards, and for the regulator itself.

Earlier this year, the regulator invited volunteers to set up Water Action Groups (WAGs) that will monitor service providers and provide feedback to the regulatory body. Recently, the WAGvolunteers underwent training to equip them with tools and skills needed to play the watchdog role. The WAGs are also being supported to establish stronger working relationships with water service providers, the local water service board, and the regulator so that they can jointly exchange information, adopt communication and accountability tools, and document lessons learned during the pilot.

Contact: Rosemary Rop at wspaf@worldbank.org

EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC

First Draft of Water Law is Refined in Lao PDR
The Lao People’s Democratic Republic have revised and refined the country’s draft Law on Water Supply. At a May 4-5 workshop, co-hosted by the Department of Housing and Urban Planning of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport and the Economic and Finance Department of the National Assembly and supported by WSP, participants discussed sector implementation issues and proposed reforms for Lao PDR, as well as key issues in the current draft Law on Water Supply prior to submitting it to the National Assembly's Law Committee.

The first draft law aims to create a legal framework with institutional rights and duties for the diverse range of actors for water services to drive sector reform in the country. During the workshop, participants shared experience with a Sri Lankan member of parliament (Sri Lanka Perspective of Water Supply, Sanitation and Water Management) and a former speaker of the Australian House of Representatives (Fresh Water Management and Irrigation Scheme in Australia). Attendees included members of parliament and staff from relevant ministries. Results from WSP’s Economics of Sanitation Initiative (ESI) phase I study were also presented.

Contact: Viengsamay Vongkhamsao at wspeap@worldbank.org

Handwashing Public Service Announcement Plays in Indonesian Banks, Factories
As part of the WSP-supported Public Private Partnership for Handwashing With Soap (PPP-HWWS), the world’s largest instant noodle maker, Indofood Sukses Makmur, and Bank Tabungan Pensiunan Nasional (Bank BTPN) have begun playing a handwashing promotional video in their public and corporate spaces. As of June, the video has been on display in 366 banks in 14 provinces and 32 Indofood office and production sites across Indonesia.

Meanwhile, the PPP-HWWS has also initiated a mass media program to help prevent the spread of the swine flu. On May 9, a television talk show aired  to increase public awareness on the current flu pandemic and the importance of handwashing with soap for prevention. The talk show, sponsored by Reckitt Benckiser’s Dettol and Royal Taruma Hospital, presented Ir. Nugroho Tri Utomo, a Core Member of PPP-HWWS and Dr. Elizabeth Hutapea from Royal Taruma Hospital.

Contact: Ida Rafiqah at wspeap@worldbank.org
Mobilizing Domestic Private Sector Partnership in Three Countries
Government representatives from the three countries under the Sanitation and Water Partnership for the Mekong Region (SAWAP) participated in a study tour from April 19-25 to visit and review private sector partnerships (PSP) models in water supply and sanitation in Vietnam, Lao PDR, and Cambodia.

During the study tour they shared viewpoints and assessments on the selected PSP models and discussed mechanisms to mobilize PSPs in their countries within the framework of SAWAP.

For example, the Cambodia discussion pointed out that the key measures identified for achieving the Cambodia Millennium Development Goals are institutional strengthening, human resources development and capacity building, improving financial efficiency and management, and maintaining and improving infrastructure and technical efficiency. From the water utilities side, the challenges remain in limited capacity and skills and poor infrastructure.  Participants suggested the way forward for the utilities include to: (1) expand and improve service coverage, (2) improve level of service standard, (3) improve technical and economic efficiency and financial viability and (4) address the specific need of the poor and protect the environment.

Organized by WSP, the study tour facilitated learning, sharing, and replication between Vietnam and SAWAP countries, and included 13 representatives from Government agencies responsible for mobilization of PSP.

Contact: Vinh Thanh Nguyen, Hang Diem Nguyen at wspeap@worldbank.org
Strategic Plans Developed to Improve Service for 800,000 in Indonesia
Strategic plans have been developed to strengthen  the abilities of 632 Community Based Organizations (CBOs) in Indonesia to offer improved and expanded water and sanitation services to the more than 800,000 rural people (175,000 households), whom the CBOs serve in five districts of East and West Java provinces.

The plans were developed for CBO federations, support groups within district governments, and an NGO, with assistance from WSP, through the Indonesia Multi Village Pooling Project (MVP-Project). 

Besides revisiting the vision and mission of these intermediaries, the strategic plans focus on redefining the services that these organizations will provide to their members and designing strategies to reach these aims in the next three years.  In the coming months, MVP will assist these organizations to implement the strategic plans through development and training on technical and financial systems and dialogues on the mutual rights and obligations between local governments, CBOs, and support organizations, formulated in local model regulations. The impetus for the development of these plans came from an assessment of the capacity of 171 Community Based Organizations (CBOs) to expand water and sanitation services.

Contact: Jemima Sy at wspeap@worldbank.org
Inter-local Government Initiatives
The Sustainable Sanitation in East Asia (SuSEA) Philippines Program is supporting the establishment of a Water Quality Management Area (WQMA) for the Silway River watershed. The watershed is home to large and small scale agricultural plantations, mostly pineapple, vegetables, and coconut, numerous backyard and large hog farms, more than 100 small water supply providers, housing subdivisions, hotels, malls, schools, and commercial and industrial establishments. Creating the WQMA is challenging considering the many local government units (LGU) and multi-sector nature of the issue and that it requires extensive human, time, and financial resources to initiate the first steps.

SuSEA has taken the initiative in helping the Environmental Management Bureau (EMB) regional office to create the WQMA and its implementing institutions. A primary objective of a WQMA is to improve and protect the quality of water and have it meet standards for the prevailing classification of the water body as safe, for the greater and long term interest and welfare of its users.

Contact:wspeap@worldbank.org

GLOBAL

New Report Identifies Barriers, Offers Solutions to Water and Sanitation Service Delivery to Urban Poor
Giving poor people a say in the water and sanitation services they receive, and allowing alternative documentation to prove residence are some of the simple solutions that can bring sustainable water and sanitation services to the hundreds of millions currently living without, according to a new report released by the Water and Sanitation Program (WSP). According to UNICEF and WHO, 900 million do not drink safe water and 2.5 billion people live without access to improved sanitation, leading to millions of deaths every year, mostly of children under five.

The report, Guidance Notes on Services for the Urban Poor: A practical guide for improving water and sanitation services, identifies barriers to service delivery for poor people living in urban areas in Africa, East and South Asia, and Latin America and recommends practical solutions to overcome them.

“Hundreds of millions of people are living in these conditions, but the underlying reasons preventing service delivery can vary depending on whether a person lives in the city or in the countryside,” said WSP Program Manager Jae So. “To identify appropriate solutions, we must identify these contexts, examine the barriers, and formulate logical and practical steps that can be implemented to overcome them.” For a copy of the full report, click here.

Contact: Geeta Sharma at wspsa@worldbank.org

LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

From LAC to the World: Lessons from Improved Hygiene Practices and Behavior Change Program in Peru
The Improved Hygiene Practices and Behavior Change Program in Peru is providing relevant lessons to the global program for Scaling up Handwashing Behavioral Change being implemented in Senegal, Tanzania, and Vietnam. In particular, the successful experiences in Peru have stemmed from the ability to generate crucial local political commitment from the very beginning, especially when building sector capacity.

The Peru experience has found that it is recommendable to first identify the comparative advantages of different sectors participating in the initiative (Health, Education, Water and Sanitation) before specifying the manner in which they complement each other. 

While a relatively simple approach, the burden lies in facilitating this process at the local level and adjusting for different opportunities and strengths of each sector.  The Peru initiative is also showing a trigger for behavior change by proving that mothers and caretakers are willing to adopt handwashing habits once they understand the linkage between handwashing with soap at critical times, and improved child welfare and development.

The handwashing Program has expanded from Peru to Central America, where the Central America and Dominican Republic Forum have assigned a Coordinator for Water and Sanitation (FOCARD-APS). The Central American coordinator traveled to Peru for an intensive 10-day internship with WSP and other stakeholders, focused on designing and implementing improved hygiene practices and behavioral change initiatives, developing innovative tools for behavioral change, and facilitating partnership building with the private and public sectors.

Contact: Rocio Florez at wsplac@worldbank.org
Using Improved Hygiene to Prevent Influenza A- H1N1
In Central America, the experience of the improved hygiene practice and behavior change initiative is contributing to a behavioral change program to prevent the spread of the influenza A-H1N1.

The A-H1N1 pandemic in Central America is demanding a quick response from governments.  National committees have been formed to adopt preventive measures, including the adoption of improved hygiene practices such as handwashing with soap. Currently the FOCARD-APS Regional Coordinator is supporting the creation of local committees for partnership building in Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Costa Rica. In most countries, the committees are under the leadership of the Ministries of Health with support from UNICEF, WSP, and WHO, who are actively involved in preparing prevention plans for the A-H1N1 virus emergency.

Contact: Rafael Vera at wsplac@worldbank.org

SOUTH ASIA

Pakistan Adopts Road Map to Achieve Sanitation Targets
Pakistan is accelerating its efforts to achieve 100 percent sanitation coverage by 2015. At a national conference in Islamabad, Minister of Environment, Hameedullah Jan Afridi enhanced Pakistan’s international commitment to achieve the critical Millennium Development Goal (MDG) on sanitation. Mr. Jawed Ali Khan, his Director General, also presented a comprehensive roll-out plan for translating the National Sanitation Policy into action. Mr. Khan outlined a reward system to incentivize local government jurisdictions that achieve Open Defecation Free status and other sanitation outcomes.

“In addition to MDG targets, I propose to set Pakistan specific targets for the year 2015 … I would propose 100 percent sanitation coverage for all by 2015,” stated the Minister, at the first Pakistan Conference on Sanitation (PACOSAN) held end May in Islamabad. 

PACOSAN provides a country level link to the South Asian Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN), a high level ministerial conference held every two years to address the region’s critical sanitation issues. It allows Pakistan to take stock of national progress and to develop concrete plans to meet its commitments to SACOSAN III, held in New Delhi in November 2008 and the Delhi Declaration. Pakistan is the first country in the region to hold a national level sanitation conference (SAN) and its example may well be followed by other countries in the region that want to ensure that sanitation remains high on the agenda.

The conference was organized by the Ministry of Environment of Pakistan together with Plan Pakistan, Rural Support Program Network, UNICEF, Water Aid, and WSP. It brought together 300 delegates representing all four provinces and Northern Areas.  Participants included key policy makers, public sector organizations, local governments, donor agencies, civil society organizations, and NGOs. Sri Lankan government officials also took part in the conference as observers, as Sri Lanka will host the next SACOSAN in 2010.

Contact: Irfan Saeed Alrai at wspsa@worldbank.org
Pakistan's Internally Displaced Get Clean Toilets
Ensuring safe water and basic sanitation services is a critical part of emergency response in humanitarian crises, along with other key priorities like shelter. Often the standard and quality of provided water services is compromised, which may lead to severe epidemic outbreaks instead of preventing them.

In order to respond to the current massive crisis of over 2.3 million internally displaced people (IDP) in Pakistan, the Ministry of Environment, together with other partners, launched an initiative responding to the emergency needs of IDPs in water, sanitation, and hygiene. The initiative consists of two components.

The first one should benefit all the IDPs by providing basic guidelines on water, sanitation, and hygiene services to community-based organizations, non-governmental and charity organizations, and host communities of IDPs. These guidelines focus on safe construction, operation, and maintenance of water and sanitation facilities. The second part of the initiative entails constructing water and sanitation infrastructure like bore holes, water tanks, latrines, and solid waste management systems for the use by approximately 6,000 IDPs.

WSP is supporting the Ministry of Environment in this initiative that should improve 6,000 people’s lives immediately and affects over 2.3 million people indirectly. WSP supported the design of the first component of the initiative by localizing international standards of emergency situation water and sanitation infrastructure and translating them into local languages. WSP also assisted in the design of the second part of the initiative.

WSP has previously supported the Government of Pakistan as it prepared damage and needs assessments after the 2005 earthquake in Northern Pakistan, and in 2007 WSP was part of the team that prepared the water and sanitation chapter of a damage and needs assessment after a cyclone in the Baluchistan and Sindh provinces.

Contact: Masroor Ahmad at wspsa@worldbank.org
Half a Million People in Bangladesh Access Water Safe from Arsenic
In Bangladesh, approximately half a million citizens are now drinking water safe from arsenic contamination. This is due to a pay-for-use service whereby over 36,430 water sources, such as handpumps, deep tubewells, and open wells, have been tested and colored in more than 24 of the Union Parishads that are participating in the Horizontal Learning Initiative, the peer-to-peer learning process among the Parishads. The Union Parishad is the lowest tier of local government in rural Bangladesh.

The initiative includes at least eight Union Parishads that are claiming to have achieved arsenic- safe water for all by ensuring that all water sources in their jurisdiction have been tested and marked. The political manifesto of the newly elected Awami League government carries a commitment to ensure arsenic-safe water for all by 2011 and the Ministry of Local Government has requested a review of the implementation of the National Policy for Arsenic Mitigation (NPAM).

WSP undertook a policy review of the NPAM in 2008 and is now supporting the government in the review of the Implementation Plan for Arsenic Mitigation (IPAM). The Union Parishad experience of ensuring an arsenic- safe jurisdiction wherein it is the various water providers that undertake pay-for-use testing of their sources has been a key strategic change recommended in the review of IPAM 2009.

Contact: Abdul Motaleb at wspsa@worldbank.org
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CONTACT INFORMATION
WSP Africa
World Bank
Hill Park Building
P.O. Box 30577-00100
Nairobi, Kenya
Phone (254-20)322 6334
Fax (254-20) 322 6386
wspaf@worldbank.org

WSP East Asia and the Pacific
World Bank
Jakarta Stock Exchange Building
Tower 2, 13th Floor JI. Jend. Sudirman
Kav. 52-53, Jakarta 12190, Indonesia
Phone (62-21)5299 3003
Fax (62-21) 5299 3004
wspeap@worldbank.org

WSP Latin America and the Caribbean
Water and Sanitation Program
Banco Mundial
Mision Residente del Perú
Avenida Álvarez Calderón 185
San Isidro, Lima 27, Perú
Phone (51-1) 615-0685
Fax (51-1) 615-0689
wsplac@worldbank.org

WSP South Asia
World Bank

World Bank
55 Lodi Estate
New Delhi 110003, India
Phone (91-11) 2469 0488/ 2469 0489
Fax (91-11) 2462 8250
wspsa@worldbank.org

WSP Washington DC
1818 H Street, NW
Washington, DC 20433 USA
wsp@worldbank.org


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